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Full text of "NAEB Newsletter (October 01, 1944)"

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N A £ 8 NEWS LETTER 
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EDUCATIONAL BROADCASTERS 
Frank £. Schooley, Editor, Station WILL, Urbana, III. 

October I, 1944 

ANNUAL N A E B MEETING IN CHICAGO, OCTOBER 22 AND 23 

The annual meeting of the National Association of Educational Broaocasters 
WILL BE HELO SUNDAY AND MONOAY, OCTOBER 22 AND 23, IN THE MORRISON HOTEL, 

Chicago. 

Sessions will be held Sunoay at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. in Parlor D of the Morrison,, 
Sessions on Monday call for a luncheon at noon in Parlor D and the business 

SESSION TO FOLLOW IN THE SAME PLACE. 

Room reservations should be made by delegates direct with the Morrison Hotel. 

Luncheon reservations must be made with the NAEB Executive Secretary no 
later than Sunday evening. 

There will be no speakers other than NAEB members making reports and remarks 

TO THE CONVENTION. 

Final plans for convention topics will be made on October 20. Members 

WISHING ANY PARTICULAR TOPIC SCHEDULED FOR DISCUSSION SHOULD TRANSMIT THE 
REQUEST TO THE EXECUTIVE SECRETARY IMMEDIATELY. 

Some of the topics already listed for oiscussion include: 

Securing of surplus war materials and equipment for educational use. 

The FCC Hearing on Post-War Use of the Spectrum. 

Legislation of radio broadcasting. 

Listener surveys for educational stations. 

Political broadcasts over educational stations*. 

NAEB membership and affiliation. 

Roundtable on member station activities. 

I *ll see you in Chicago. a N o, ! *m going to have to travel 800 miles that 
week-end to get there, too, Ripley. 

KENTUCKY ROUNDTABLE ON WHAS 

Dr, Henry Noble Sherwood, acting head of the department of political 
science at the University of Kentucky, ano former president of Georgetown 
College, will act as moderator for the University’s weekly roundtable 
series over WHAS, Louisville, with the opening of the fall schedule. The 
roundtable, which is broadcast on Sundays, ^2:00 to 12:30 p.m”. has been 
a University of Kentucky feature for a number of years, and concerns 

ITSELF ABOUT EQUALLY WITH INTERNATIONAL, NATIONAL AND STATE QUESTIONS OF 
POPULAR INTEREST. 




NAEB NEWS LETTER ........Page 2..........October I, 1944 

RANDOM NOTES - ABAA, Purdue University, became a user of Associated Press 
copy on September £lsr, joining other NAEB stations now carrying the Pa 
service, oo,BILLBOARD auuRB says s "Station WHCU, Ithaca, New York, has 

PROVED (VIA A SPECIAL BRAND OF PUBLIC SERVICE) THAT A STATION IN A FARM 
AREA THAT HAS BEEN A SUSTAINING EDUCATIONAL OPERATION CAN CHANGE AND DO 
A TOP COMMERCIAL JOB. H . e ANOTHER BILLBOARD BLURB * "FCC COMMISSIONER 
Fly worries some more about the press-air link. This time he worried in 
Ithaca, N.Y e , for the Cornell Profs. h „.«.More complete articles in 
8 i LLBOARD,.., V.NYC, New York City, is broadcasting four West Point games 

THIS SEASON, WITH JOE H A SEL DOING THE PLAY-BY-PLAY....W9XG, PURDUE UNIV¬ 
ERSITY, HAS BEEN GRANTEO MOD IF!CAT}ON OF ITS EXPERIMENTAL TELEVISION 
CONSTRUCTION PERM IT« •• .IQWA STATE COLLEGE HAS APPLIED FOR F.V. CONSTRUCTION 
PERMIT ON 42,900 KILOCYCLES, WITH I KILOWATT POWER . CaRL ^EN?ER WILL 
MAKE APPEARANCE FOR XAEB BEFORE FCC ON POST-WAR US E OF SPECTRUM .. . 0 NAEB 
ALSO WILL BE REPRESENTED AT THE HEARING WITH LEGAL ADVICE OF HORACE 1-0 

Lohnes, noteo Washington raoio attorney...«WHA reports exodus of production 

DIRECTOR AND ACTRESS PEGGY BolGER .,..THE J6TH ANNUAL INSTITUTE FOR tOUC- 

at ion by Radio will be held m A y 4-7 in Columbus, Ohio, according to woro 
from I. Keith Tyler, Director of the Institute. 


—SCHOOLEY 





Scanned from the National Association of Educational Broadcasters Records 
at the Wisconsin Historical Society as part of 
"Unlocking the Airwaves: Revitalizing an Early Public and Educational Radio Collection." 


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